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Adopt Zero Budget Natural Farming to make nation self-reliant, Governor urges farmers



SHIMLA- Governor Acharya Devvrat said that ‘Zero Budget Natural Farming’ was a better option for making the Nation self-reliant in agriculture sector. He said that the produce out of natural farming helped not only in healthy living but was environment friendly too. He urged the farmers to adopt natural farming (Rishi Kheti) for getting toxic free and nutritious food production.

The Governor was speaking while inaugurating four days long seminar on ‘Zero Budget Natural Farming’ organized by CSK Agriculture University, Palampur in Kangra district with the help of Eminent scientist and Padmashree Dr. Subhash Palekar, who is a pioneer of ‘zero-budget spiritual farming’, today.

The Governor urged the farmers to adopt traditional farming to enhance the quality of their produce and to get better prices in the market. He expressed concern over the use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers which not only diluted the health content in crops but also affected the fertility of the soil.

He called upon the scientists of the University to hold camps across the state to educate the farming community about traditional and natural farming and added that special awareness should be generated for adopting zero-budgeting for improving the existing agriculture practices in the State. He also asked the scientists to conduct intensive research and develop new techniques besides improving the existing ones especially in natural farming. He said the research conducted in laboratories should reach the fields and farmers.

Acharya Devvrat appealed the farmers to adopt Zero Budget Natural Farming for increasing the production in their farms besides preferring indigenous cow breeds. He said that the development of the country depended upon the growth and prosperity of farming community. He said that nothing could be implemented without any reason and the reason behind adopting natural farming was in front of us. He said that number of diseases had increased during last decades due to chemical farming and it was the right time to shift from chemical farming to natural farming.

He said that best part of adopting natural system of farming was that it has no financial implication and the farmers would not have to outsource from the market as it was prepared naturally by the farmer itself.

He urged the farmers and students of the University to participate in such seminars as they were organized with the purpose of generating awareness about traditional farming. He also urged the scientists to come out with new techniques and information to update farmers to improve their farming skills and methods.

The Governor appreciated the efforts of eminent scientist to revive the concept of zero budget natural farming in the country. He also thanked him to encourage the farmers for adopting natural farming for the benefit of the people at large.

He appreciated the University for this initiative and exhorted the students and scientists to religiously attend the workshop for four days. He expressed the hope that the workshop would enable the participants to think a fresh and open new vistas in their lives. The Governor thanked well known exponent of natural farming Padmashree Subhash Palekar for making 50 lakh farmers follow the concept of natural farming. The Governor also asked the scientists to listen and learn the new concept so that it is properly transferred to the farming community.

On the occasion, Dr. Subhash Palekar said that organic farming was based on composting and vermin compost techniques which pollute the atmosphere, as the resultant manures were known to emit huge quantities of greenhouse gases (methane) and Fukuoka approach only leads to excessive weed growth in farms, affecting crop yields.

He said that his method largely draws from ancient Indian farming techniques, at the heart of which was a formulation called ‘Jiwamrita’.

He said that the so-called modern agricultural practices taught at universities were, indeed, detrimental to farming. The only terms that got repeatedly hammered in students’ minds were fertilizers, hybrid seeds, insecticides, irrigation, and deep trenches, he added. He said that so deeply entrenched were these concepts that they made us unable to think beyond and practice anything other than chemical farming.

He explains,

The farmer needs to apply to the crop a dose of Jiwamrita — a fermented solution containing 200 litres water, 5-10 litres cow urine, 10 kg dung, 1 kg each of gur (jaggery) and besan (gram flour) for every acre. The other important thing is to spread a carpet of harvested crop residue between crop rows, which helps to absorb moisture from the atmosphere and also prevents emergence of weeds.

According to him, Jiwamrita basically nurtures thousands of bacteria essential for healthy crop growth. The urine and dung used in the formulation, he insists, should be from indigenous cattle: “one desi cow can nourish 30 acres”.

He stated that the term zero-budget farming was self-explanatory. All you spend was on seeds and Rs 5,000 per acre for laying the harvested residue carpet, which could be covered by the inter-crop raised on it, he added and said that whatever was obtained from sale of the main crop was the income.

KK. Katoch Vice Chancellor said that the university had already introduced the concept of natural farming in its post graduate level.

Director, extension Dr. P. K. Mehta also welcomed the Governor and Director, Research Dr. S.S. Kanwar proposed vote of thanks.

Progressive farmers, faculty members of the university, officers of the district administration, students, representatives of various non-governmental organizations and other prominent people were also present on the occasion.


Rohtang Tunnel access road facing increased avalanche threats as Himachal’s average temp on rise: Study



Shimla: A research carried out in Himachal Pradesh within the framework of the Indian Himalayas Climate Adaptation Program (IHCAP), a partnership led jointly by the Indian and Swiss authorities with strong scientific input from University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, has a bad news for the Hill State.

The impacts of global warming are felt especially in mountainous regions, where the rise in temperatures is above average, affecting both glacierized landscapes and water resources.

The repercussions of these changes are manifold and varied, from retreating glaciers to an increase in the frequency and intensity of snow avalanches.

A team of researchers from the UNIGE, Switzerland, has employed endrochronology– the reconstruction of past disasters as recorded in growth series of trees– to disentangle the role of global warming in the triggering avalanches.

The results of this study are published in the Proceedings of the National Academic of Science – PNAS.

Read Detailed Study

Avalanches are a natural phenomenon and occur repeatedly in mountain areas; nonetheless, rising temperatures are altering their triggering. This can lead to disasters and serious consequences in mountain areas where they can severely affect the socio-economic development and the destruction of traffic infrastructure, and buildings.

This is the case in Himachal Pradesh, where increasing residential numbers and tourism are exerting pressure on land use. Along the road to Leh, 500 km north of New Delhi, the Indian government has drilled one of the largest tunnels of the Indian sub-continent.

study of glacier melting in himcahla pradesh

Avalanche slope in the Western Himalayas used for the reconstruction of changes in avalanche frequency. Red dots indicate the locations of sampled trees. Potential release areas are indicated with semitransparent white surfaces and have been detected using the approach suggested by Bühler et al. (26). The access road to the new Rothang tunnel crosses the lower part of the slope.

With the ongoing climate warming, snow avalanches are increasingly threatening the access road to the tunnel. This is why UNIGE researchers conducted their fieldwork at the spot from 2013 to 2015, in a valley located at between 3,000 and 4,000 m.

Trees: silent witnesses to the upsurge in the number of avalanches

The aim of the research group was to evaluate – and add to – the information currently available about avalanches with two goals:

(i) To identify the nature of the changes in avalanche activity currently taking place; and

(ii) To assess future needs for tackling these changes.

In the absence of data comparable to the information collected in European surveys, for which records often exist for the past few centuries, the UNIGE researchers focused on trees: they examined stumps (when the tree had been removed) or cored trees that were still standing to reconstruct past snow avalanches at the study site.

The scientists were able to date individual events by analysing the growth rings and wounds left on the trees by avalanches. The research included nearly 150 trees.

Since we knew the position of each affected tree, we were able to reconstruct the dynamics, lateral extent and runout distance of every avalanche,

explains Juan Antonio Ballesteros-Cánovas, a senior lecturer at UNIGE’s Institute for Environmental Sciences (ISE).


This technique meant we could go back to 1855 and record 38 avalanches over this period in the valley, the largest survey conducted to date in the Himalayas.

he added.

The models used for testing the impact of climate change combine the risks of avalanche with local climate data. They were adjusted to include the likely effect on topographical features resulting from earlier avalanches.

Since they destroy the plant cover, they are an aggravating risk factor. The results brooked no argument: from the second half of the twentieth century, there has been an increase in the number of avalanches, both in terms of frequency and intensity. The frequency has risen from one event per decade to almost one event every year.

The impact of temperature on the cryosphere

Avalanches are bigger, travel greater distances and are triggered earlier in the year. These changes can be attributed clearly to rising temperatures, which have reached 0.2 to 0.4 degrees annually in some parts of the Himalayas.

And rising air temperature are also affecting the cryosphere: glaciers are receding and permafrost is melting, losing its role as a sediment stabiliser.

 In addition, the structure of the snowpack is changing: it is being transformed by increasingly warmer air temperatures and/or altered by rain-on-snow events.

Snow is now also falling earlier in the season and is being destabilised before spring, at a time when it is thicker, leading to an increase in the number and intensity of avalanches.

Since the snow is wet, avalanches are descending slowly but over greater distances than in the past.


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Himachal 72% rain deficient, witnessed above normal temp during 2018 winters 



Himachal rain deficient in 2018 winters

Shimla: The winter session 2018 for Himachal Pradesh ended on February 28. During this winter season, which is counted from January 1- Feb 28, the climate left Himachal, especially the agricultural community and fruit growers worried.

As per the detailed report issued by the Meteorological Department, by the end of this winter session, Himachal received a cumulative rainfall of 55.1 mm, which is 72% deficient from average normal rainfall.

In January and February, total cumulative rainfall received was 9.2mm and 46 mm respectively, which was deficient by (-)91% & (-53%) from normal values for respective months.

Rainfall during Winter Sessions of Recent Years

Year  Actual Normal  Departure in %
2017 203.9mm  195.5mm 4%
2016  57.1mm  195.5mm  -71%
2015 213.4mm  195.5mm  9%
2014 187.2mm  195.5mm – 4%

During the Winter Season 2018, average minimum temperatures over the mid-hills and high hills of the state were above normal. Over the low hills areas and plains of the state, average minimum temperatures were normal or below normal.

During this winter season, the average minimum temperature of Shimla in the month of January was 4.7deg C, which was 2.1deg C more than more than normal. In February, it was 5.5 deg C, which was 1.9deg C more than normal.

District wise Cumulative Rainfall during the Winter Season 2018
(1st Jan to 28th Feb 2018)

Name of the District Actual Rainfall (mm) Normal Rainfall (mm) % departure from the normal
BILASPUR  50.4 129.3 -61
CHAMBA  75.3 239 68
HAMIRPUR  54 134.4 -60
KANGRA  58.3 163.2 -64
KINNAUR 38.6 209.9 -82
KULLU  73.6 183.9 -60
LAHAUL & SPITI  51.8 269.9 -81
MANDI 56.2 138.6 -59
SHIMLA  44.2 139.4 -68
SIRMAUR  61.7 111.7 -45
SOLAN  54.9 137.8 -60
UNA  42.3 91.4 -54
HIMACHAL PRADESH  55.1 195.5 -72

Important facts about 2018 Winters in Himachal

  • Rainfall during this winter season remained below normal in all the districts of the state.
  • Rainfall was most deficient in the districts of Kinnaur-38.6mm (-82%) and Lahaul & Spiti-51.8mm (-81%) respectively.
  • Cumulative Rainfall during the season in the districts of Chamba- 75.3mm & Shimla- 44.2mm was deficient with a deficit of 68% from their normal values.
  • During the winter season 2018, three spells of Widespread Rainfall had occurred (one spell in January and two spells in February) during which Rainfall/ Snowfall occurred over most places in the state.
  • On January 24, 2018, Himachal recorded widespread rainfall over the state with prominent rainfall recorded at Sangraha- 32mm, Rajgarh- 29mm respectively.
  • During this spell, Khadrala- 13cm, Mashobra- 12cm, Bharmaur-10cm, Jahnjheli-10cm and few other places received snowfall.
  • During widespread rainfall spell on 12-13 February 2018, Baijnath-50mm, Dharamsala-28mm, Barsar-27mm, Saluni & Chamba-30mm received rainfall.
  • During this spell,  Gondhla-70cm, Kothi- 60cm, Keylong-36 cm, Bharmaur-30cm & Kalpa-21cm received snowfall.
  • On 23-24th February, widespread rainfall/snowfall occurred over the state. Saluni- 54mm, Kheri- 53mm recorded prominent rainfall.
  • During this spell, highest snowfall spell was recorded at Udaipur-39cm followed by Gondhla-35cm, Kalpa-19cm, Kothi-22cm, and Khadrala-15cm.
  • Highest rainfall/snowfall in the day during this season was recorded at Saluni-54mm on Feb 25, 2018.
  • The average minimum temperature of Kalpa in the month of Jan was -2.2deg C, which was 1.7 deg C more than normal. In February, the temperature was -0.8 deg C, which was 1.1deg C more than normal.
  • However, the average minimum temperature of Una in January was 3.8deg C, which was 0.4deg C less than normal, and in February, it was 7.9 deg C, which was 0.9deg C more than normal.
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Kangra mining mafia assault case: Police held back from taking action



mining mafia in Indora area of kangra district

Mining mafia active in Indora region of Kangra district abducted Puran Chand of Mand-Myani, almost beat him to death with sticks and iron rods, and threw him near Nangal Boor bordering Punjab.

Shimla: Though the Chief Minister Jairam Thakur led Bhartiya Janata Party has been harping about the elimination of mining, forest, and drug mafia in Himachal Pradesh, but in speeches and media statements only.

In its media statements, the new government has taken expeditious action and is up in arms against the mafia, just like the previous government.

The mining mafia had only emboldened during the previous Congress-led government, and it continues to grow after the BJP romped into power in assembly elections held in November.

Now, the situation has become such that mafia has begun to abduct and assault villagers, who are daring to protest against the destruction of the rivulet. The police is yet again held back by the patrons of the mafia.

On January 30, the mining mafia active in Indora region of Kangra district abducted Puran Chand of Mand-Myani, almost beat him to death with sticks and iron rods, and threw him near Nangal Boor bordering Punjab.

He was first taken to the Civil Hospital in Pathankot, and then to Tanda Medical College, Kangra, in a critical condition.

After nine days of the attack, the culprits, identified as stone-crusher owners, are at large not because our police is incompetent, rather because our leaders and government have always been ceding the control to the mafia.

The cause of failure of police needs no explanation considering the fact that the police had filed a complaint against eight assaulters named by the victim. The Chief Minister had visited the victim and had assured him justice, which proved to be only a media statement so far.

Enraged over the inaction of the police, the people had gheraoed the police station, Indora on January 31. They demanded booking the culprits for an attempted murder (Section 307 IPC). The district administration failed to pacify the situation and had to face the wrath of people, who shouted anti-police slogans.

Isn’t it strange that despite the establishment of the Sub-divisional Magistrate (SDM) office in the region, illegal mining still goes on with no fear of the law?  

As per the allegations labelled by villagers,  the explanation of this inaction of the district administration and police lies in the fat monetary benefits offered by the stone crushers and miners.

This conflict between the common people and growing influence of the mafia is going on for years, but the situation worsened between 2014 to the current date.

As per the Kisan Sabha Unit of Kangra, Puran was playing a leading role in the protest against the illegal miners since 2014, which is why he was targeted to terrorize locals.

Now, the villagers are opposing the movement of tippers carrying mining material. In return, the stone crushers are also obstructing a small bridge to harass the villagers.

Along with the mafia,  the government seems to have lost the fear of law too, because the State High Court and the National Green Tribunal (NGT), in 2017, had made serious observations regarding the illegal mining and had imposed a complete ban on mining in tributaries of the Beas. 

Following the orders, the administration and the mining department registered several cases for a while but soon discontinued their surveillance due to reasons unknown.

The transfers of IPS Gaurav Singh from Baddi and Sanjeev Gandhi, former superintendent of police, Una, are sufficient to support the allegation of patronage to mafias by the government.

Gandhi had tightened the noose around the mining mafia by launching a special drive for this purpose. In March 2017, the police had even caught the offenders red-handed in Damtal region of the district and seized JCBs and vehicles found on the spot.

However, the amount of money and politicians or their relatives who are, directly or indirectly, involved in illegal mining, make the government agencies accede to mafia raj.      

In 2017, Gandhi was slapped three different transfer orders in just 17 days.

He went after the miners in the district who was supplying the illegally mined material to the neighbouring state of Punjab and registered 27 cases against illegal mining.

However, as a reward, his transfer order was issued in his absence within two days after the stone crusher owners and illegal miners exerted pressure on the BJP government.

Previously, during the Congress government, Gandhi, then posted as SP Kangra, had launched a similar drive against the mining mafia. He had registered 17 FIRs alongwith action against 950 violations in just seven months during his tenure in 2016-2017.

During that period, several machines and vehicles were seized by the authorities, which were later released unlawfully.  

The mining mafia in the district heaved a sigh of relief when the administration released impounded vehicles in a gross violation of rules and the NGT in its specific orders had directed the state agencies not to release such vehicles.  Sources said with the intervention of senior officers of the state government, these vehicles were released,

said a report published in the English daily.

He had even conducted a survey of stone crusher units set up near the Chakki rivulet, a tributary of Beas that marks the boundary between Himachal and Punjab, in the Nurpur and Indora jurisdiction.

Chakki rivulet in the subdivision bordering Punjab and Himachal Pradesh is a witness to the rampant and illegal mining that is threatening over 10 panchayats.  The people in the area are dependent on the Chakki water for irrigation.

Illegal and access mining with heavy machinery is turning the fertile fields into barren land. The mafia has destroyed local paths, water channels, and cremation ground, alleges the villagers.

The rivulet is marked by huge ditches as the mining mafia are not adhering to the rules and regulations for extraction of mining material. The government is bearing the huge loss of revenue as the mafia easily evades royalty and local taxes.

At that time, he was transferred to Una. Within four months, he was again transferred.

In 2016, the state High Court had also taken suo-motu- cognizance of the matter, and the Division Bench comprising Chief Justice Mansoor Ahmad Mir and Justice Sandeep Sharma had questioned the Congress government over regressive actions against honest officials.

Earlier, the Kisan Sabha’s protest had compelled the authorities to visit the mining spots, and they had admitted that illegal mining activity was prevalent in the area. The inspection team had found that the miners had excavated upto a depth of about 40 feet. Despite that, no action was ever taken against the culprits, alleged the Kisan Sabha.

The Sabha has expressed doubts over the intentions of the new government as no action is being taken against the perpetrator. The Sabha has also threatened the government that it will launch a massive protest against it if appropriate action is not taken against the assaulters and other stone crushers and mining mafia active in the region illegally.  

As the government, which has failed to keep the mining mafia at the bay, has recently asked Punjab for demarcation of its boundary. The unclear boundary line makes it easier for miners from Punjab to intrude into Himachal.

In a report published in another English daily, the police officials in Kangra had admitted that when they chase mafia, the Punjab police raise the issue of jurisdiction.

A similar attempt was made during 2015 to take up the matter with Pathankot counterparts seeking demarcation of the boundary along the Chakki Khud.

By delaying the right action, the government is not only condoning the offenders, but also ignoring the gravity of the environmental debacle that the excess, unscientific, and illegal mining is causing.

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