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Watch : Families living in inhuman, hazardous conditions due to Baddi MC’s dumping ground

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Baddi MC Dumping Ground

Solan: In Kenduwal village, Sandholi Panchayat, the Municipal Council of Baddi created a dumping ground right next to the houses of five Gujjar families two years ago. As a result, the families are now forced to live in inhuman conditions.

In addition to the foul smell from the garbage that makes normal breathing difficult, children, elderly, and cattle frequently fall ill because of the unhygienic conditions of the dump.

In the last two years, 20 cows and four 4 buffaloes have died because of this dump,

says Gulam Nabi from Kenduwal village.

The gravest of all issues is that the path meant for commuting (right of way) used by the five families having 30 members has been obstructed because of the dump. The trucks of MC often break their water-pipelines and garbage completely chokes the path.

As a matter of concern, the affected families alleged that the issue was brought to the notice of the administration several times but no action ever came.

Today, these families met the Sub-Divisional Magistrate (SDM) at Nalagarh to file a formal complaint about the intolerable living conditions created by this dumping and appeal for immediate action to relocate the dump. The SDM in response took the statement of the aggrieved parties and has said he will take suo-moto action in the matter.

The aggrieved families also submitted copies of the complaint to the Deputy Commissioner, HP Pollution Control Board, and Police Station.

In the recent days, due to rains, the path was submerged in obnoxious smelling mucky water due to the garbage dump and the issue was raised many times with the office of Municipal Council.

The Municipal Council assured the families by saying that the path would be repaired.

With a great difficulty, on July 6, the Municipal Council arranged a truck of sand to raise the path. After which another truckload of sand was needed to complete the job but in the meantime, another garbage truck arrived. To prevent the truck from causing damage to the path, women tried to stop the truck from advancing.

Over this, the truck driver, labour managing garbage got into a heated argument with us. They used foul language and did not pay heed to what we had to say which led to a clash between us. We want to make it clear to the administration that we do not have any issues with the labourers, but the dumping of tonnes of garbage in front of our homes is insensitive inhuman and that is what our complaint is about,”

said Nabi.

The families said the police has registered an FIR against them to pressurise them.

Himdhara, a group that is working on environmental issues, has arrived at Baddi to undertake a fact-finding task.

According to Manshi Asher, member of Himdhara, such dumping of urban waste is a gross violation of the Environmental Protection Act. Based on the Act, in 2016, the Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change had brought out the ‘solid waste management rules’.

As mentioned in the rules, a solid waste dumping site has to be at least 200 meters away from the place of habitation. Also, floodplains of rivers cannot be chosen as dumping site either.

It is also clearly mentioned in the Solid Waste Management Rules that the site of the landfill should be fenced and should have a gate with a concrete path inside it. The Municipal Council has violated this rule as well, said Manshi.

Can you imagine how they’re living right next to dumping site as huge as five acres?

asked Manshi.

The Gujjar community belongs to the Scheduled Tribe category in our country. They rear cattle, which grazes on public lands and make a living by selling the milk. The complaint filed, which was submitted to the Superintendent of Police and the Pollution Control Board as well also states that:

“The Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribe (Prevention of Atrocities) Act 1989” section 3 subsection 1 (b) states that in the vicinity of places of residence of people belonging to scheduled caste/tribe, disposing fecal matter, garbage, animal carcass or other obnoxious substances whereby unease is caused to them is a punishable offence. Officials not responding to complaints made by members of the SC/ST community are also flouting the law.

We are making a report on this matter and sending it to all administrative offices of the State as well as the Centre,

said the members of Himdhara.

The Gujjars are not the only ones troubled. Since last 6 months, villagers from Malpur have complained about the dumping ground as well as the Common Effluent Treatment Plant also located in Kenduwal, due to the smell. It is shocking that the pollution control board hasn’t taken any steps in this regard.

The families have warned that if no action was taken regarding their grievance, they would be left with no other option but to approach the court.

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Apple Industry in Himachal Facing a Headwind From an Unlikely Facet

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Apple Season Traffic in Shimla 3

Shimla-Amidst manifest slowdown in the economy, 1.30 lakhs apple growers in Himachal Pradesh are facing a headwind. The problem these apple growers are confronting with may have more to do with town and country planning, rather than esoteric economics principles or concepts.

As the apple season picked up momentum in Shimla district-a major apple belt- the vehicles carrying the produce to the mandis are facing a gridlock. The 55 Km road stretch from Narkanda to Bhatakkafur has become a focal point; last week the stretch encountered a terrible traffic jam and it took 5-6 hours to commute this stretch. This has kept the apple growers on a tenterhook as the traffic jam has precluded their apple produce to reach the fruit mandi in time.

Apple Season Traffic in Shimla 2

More importantly, the more frequent such inordinate delay, the lesser chances that their produce will fetch handsome returns. The predicament has left these growers disgruntled with the administration for want of better traffic management.

This prompted the administration to swing into action with a slew of measures: the vehicles having a token will only be allowed to enter Bhattakufer mandi, such tokens will be made available at Charabra and Koti; a complete  ban on the parking of vehicles along the roadside from Hassan Valley to Bhattakufar and  on Shoghi Taradevi road; the vehicles after unloading the apples at Bhattakufar mandi will have to commute back via Mashobra-Bekhalti road.

Albeit, it’s unlikely these steps will solve the fundamental issues responsible for their woes: the absence of a market yard to cater to the present demand, and relentless increase in the unplanned shops of fruit agents on the roadside.

The decades old fruit mandi at Bhattakufar has failed to withstand the present-day demand as its infrastructure has outlived its utility. 

For long, apple growers associations have been demanding a new commodious market yard equipped with ultra-modern facilities; but it never came. Had the market yard come, it would have not only decongested the traffic on the Hindustan Tibet Road but, also would have catered to the present-day requirements. The apple industry has seen radical changes over the last decade: it’s now technology-driven that brings produce to the market in a glut, creating a bottleneck in the market. 

Seizing this opportunity, a legion of fruit merchant has mushroomed along the Hindustan Tibet Road over the past decade. Initially, much to the delight of apple growers as apple market became competitive fetching growers better return for their products than ever.  But now, these shops have become a bane of commuter and hurting everyone.  

Apple Season Traffic in Shimla

Most of these shops are housed either in the temporary structures or in under-construction buildings. Moreover, these shops are without ample parking space, therefore, loading and unloading are done on the roadside creating congestion on the road and ultimately leading to traffic jams. Also, the situation has transformed into an unnerving concern of road safety.

Apple Season Traffic in Shimla 4

Just travel beyond Theog towards Narkanda, you will find an illustration portraying what chaos such fruit shops have created. Simply, a deracination of Town and Country planning concepts. This haphazard proliferation of fruit shops along the roadside must be stopped, and such construction should be brought under the ambit of the law.

Now with the change of guard in the state, and new government going big and aggressive on attracting private investments. A clamour for a fruit market yard with ultra-modern amenities is apt and congruous with present-day requirements. Going forward, all we need to ensure is that clamour is loud enough and reach the ears that matter. 

Meanwhile, we must keep waiting as it’s unlikely the traffic jams on the Narkanda-Bhatakuffar stretch on Hindustan Tibet Road will go any sooner. And best of worst may be yet to come. Who knows!

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The Curse of NGT Judgment – Undoing of Urban Planning

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Impact of NGT Orders on Shimla City's Development

Shimla– An old ‘common law’ proverb from the British era says “A man’s house is his castle, et domus sua cuique est tutissimum refugium [and each man’s home is his safest refuge]”. This principle, which needs to be strengthened in a free country, is sadly in shambles and perhaps held more truth in the colonial times than it holds now. The level of insecurity a man has with respect to the ownership or for making improvements in his living space/house or building is increasing day by day because of unreasoned judgments of Courts or illogical executive dictates.

In these series of articles (1,2 & 3), the impact of various laws and judgments which have essentially worked for depriving the common citizens in State of H.P, of their ‘Right to Property” will be critically examined.

This article is aimed at academically discussing and pointing out the perversitie and manifest errors in the ‘NGT Judgement’ which was passed on November 16, 2017. The judgment banned all construction activities in the green and core areas and also within 3 meters from national highways. It also restricted the number of stories to two-and-a-half in other areas where construction was permitted to up to 4 to 5 stories.

THE UNHEARD VICTIMS

The Order adversely affects many different categories of people. For instance, a person who has a sanctioned plan in accordance with TCP Law/By-Laws/Rules, who had saved his ‘life savings’ for the construction of his house, is now stuck in limbo, having done nothing wrong. If a man had the approval and sanctioned plan of  ‘four and a half story’ building, which was permitted under TCP law, he is now told that he cannot construct the house in accordance with that initial sanction.

Another man who has his sole plot/property in the core area is prevented from doing anything with it, though he may have buildings on either side of his plot. The significance of the initial sanction and the mandate of the Town and Country Planning Act is bypassed by the Hon’ble Tribunal which is not even competent to decide the matter under such Laws (TCP Act/ MC Act). To add insult to injury, such persons are not even heard or paid compensation before they are so monumentally impacted by the decision.

The Constitution makers bestowed right on every citizen of the country to acquire, hold and dispose of property and  also provided ample safeguards against deprivation of the property by confining such deprivation only on payment of compensation to the expropriated owner. As such, the judgment is against the spirit of Article 300-A of the Indian Constitution.

IMPACTING DEVELOPMENT BY ABSURD AND BLANKET DIRECTION

1. Around 52 ‘Shimla Smart City Projects’, which aim at improving the infrastructural base of the city, are directly impacted by this judgment and are stalled. Such a wide impact of this blanket direction neither can be conceived nor can be expected to be implemented if the city has to grow. Further, such powers were never envisaged under the NGT Act which creates the Hon’ble Tribunal.

2. Another blanket and absurd direction is where the judgment prohibits new construction of any kind, i.e. residential, institutional and commercial in any part of the core area as defined under the various notifications issued under the Interim Development Plan as well by the State Government.

According to the standing laws of the State, the reconstruction in the green areas is permissible on old lines and construction in the core area with the permission of the State Government is also permissible, as per the existing laws (Notification/Statutes). If someone’s house is falling or has become structurally unsafe he should obviously be allowed to reconstruct on old lines, but this is also prevented as a consequence of these directions.    The tribunal has not quashed the relevant notifications which deal with this issue and has said something completely contrary to the existing laws. Now the situation is that we have two sets of laws, which are completely opposite to each other. The Tribunal doesn’t have the power to quash these laws nor interpret them.

3. The most Absurd direction is where the judgment says that beyond core, green and the areas falling within the authorities of the Shimla Planning Area, the constructions may be permitted strictly but not beyond two stories plus attic floor.

According to the law of the land, the construction in the core areas is being regulated by the provisions of the Interim Development Plan for Shimla as amended vide notification dated  28th June’ 2016, which clearly provides that the construction in the core area of Shimla is not story-based but is based upon the  maximum floor area ratio and maximum height of the building which is 1.50 to 1.75 & 21 meters respectively. Similarly, in the non-core areas of Shimla, the maximum floor area ratio is 1.75 & the maximum height of the building is 21 meters. Since the provisions of the Interim Development Plan for Shimla are still in operation, the same are now in conflict with the directions imparted by the Hon’ble Tribunal.

Traumatizing & Patent Illegality of the Judgement

There are numerous errors in the said judgment of the Hon’ble Tribunal, some are legal errors and others are factual errors. The judgment not only enters into a field which is outside its purview, but it also gives a shortsighted vision of its own in the matters of planning and development without comprehending the complexity of the factual problems which exists on the ground.

Though there are many flaws in the judgment, in this first article of the series, some of them have been enumerated as follows:

Firstly, the judgment dated 16.11.2017 has been passed in violation of the principles of natural justice and without giving an opportunity of being heard to those persons who stand adversely affected. The principles of natural justice concern procedural fairness and ensure a fair decision is reached by an objective decision-maker. Maintaining procedural fairness protects the rights of individuals and enhances public confidence in the process. Right of being heard is a right given to those parties who will be adversely affected by the decision. This right is a backbone for a ‘Fair Trial’. Such an important aspect of the judicial proceeding is missing in this case. Numerous persons whose property rights have been taken away have not been heard until now. The judgment should fall on this ground alone.

Secondly, the Tribunal is not even competent, or in other words, has the necessary jurisdiction to hear or decide matters relating to TCP Act or Municipal Corporation Act. The Tribunal is specifically established for matters which relate to ‘Environment’ and laws/Acts which deal with the protection of the same for e.g Environment Protection Act, Water Act, Air Act, etc. The tribunal certainly cannot br expected to interpret TCP Act and MC Act or bypass the mandate of Article 300 A and deprive persons of their houses or stop future government projects which are necessary for effectively implementing State policies.

Thirdly A peculiar problem which has arisen right now is that ‘Town and Country Planning Act’ provisions are not struck down and NGT judgment, which is saying something completely opposite, also stands. It is a rule of thumb that when the Courts have to disagree with a statuary provision for being unconstitutional etc., they will either quash it or read it down. NGT has done none of it, nor it could have done anything in this respect since these two acts are outside its jurisdiction. These acts fall within the jurisdiction of the Hon’ble High Court or the Hon’ble Apex Court.

When the law of the land has not been quashed or struck down, it obviously means that it is still the law of the land and has to be implemented. The judgment seems to be more on the lines of guidelines rather being a dictate or laying down an authoritative pronouncement.

Another fundamental flaw in the judgment is that the Tribunal has traveled way beyond the petition/application and what was prayed by the Applicant who approached it. The Courts, as a rule of practice, are limited to the pleadings which are filed before it, in this case, the Hon’ble Tribunal has gone far beyond the petition which it was deciding. The phrase ‘knight roaming in a shining armor’ is apt for this judgment. Here, the Court has set out to make right all the problems and evils of the State and has done future planning both for urban and rural areas and for the lakhs of inhabitants of such areas.

An important principle which has been forgotten in these blanket directions is ‘Actus curiae neminem gravabit’. The act of the Court shall prejudice no man. (Cumber v. Wane, i Sm. L. C. i ith ed. p. 338.)’.  The number of people who have been condemned unheard is astoundingly large. The livelihood of thousands is at stake, the development of the urban and rural areas of the State is at stake. These people are not criminals, these development plans are not out of the ordinary rather are a necessity for a growing city. The development plans have rightly been drawn by the competent authority under a well-established law. If the law is ‘common sense’ then this sense demands that these directions need a relook. If a law makes lakhs of people in the State as law breakers than there is something wrong with the law itself.

Right to Shelter, Challenges of Providing Housing to the Growing Population

It must be remembered that if everyone is compelled to make two and a half stories or not construct on vacant plots, it would lead to scarcity of housing or it would lead to cutting down of more trees as more land/surface area would be required to construct such houses. To sustain the growing population 4 to 5 storied buildings which if found structurally safe and not impacting the environment were perfectly reasonable and rightly allowed by the TCP/MC laws.

Right to shelter is a fundamental right and right of people to move from rural to urban areas is also a basic right. Both these rights stand defeated if these directions are not quashed. Housing will just become more and more expensive and out of the reach of poor and middle-class families. Old structures won’t be reconstructed, no new constructions will be raised, and no new Government projects can come up. The view of main Shimla town apart from Mall Road, which looks like a ghetto, will always remain like a ghetto.

In case of an earthquake, the chances of survival of the ‘High Court building’ (7 stories) and the ‘Cecil Hotel’ building (9 stories) are way more than the two-storied buildings of  Shimla’s lower bazaar /middle bazaar.  The point is that Morden technology and latest techniques of construction allow us to provide structurally safer buildings than what we had in the past. Further, they can also sustain more population in less surface area of land and fulfill a huge public purpose by doing so. The height of buildings as provided in municipal and TCP laws in accordance with floor to height ratio were reasonably arrived at by the competent authority. The Courts certainly are not equipped nor are expected to venture into this area which is outside their powers and tell us ‘how many stories can be built’, it is certainly the domain of the executive as they have experts with them and also have a better grasp of the ground reality (At least in theory).

The cost of such broad-ranging directions and ideas is very high – particularly on Shimla Town and its housing, making the cost of living and doing business costly and hurting the local enterprises, and thereby, shifting the planned outcomes into a different direction with respect to economic opportunities. The focus of the planning approach has to shift from ‘development restricting’ approach toward ‘development enabling’ approach and it requires finalization of the Developmental plan for the city. It is extremely surprising that Shimla City does not have a final development plan in place to date (this will be discussed elaborately in future articles).

There are numerous other directions and issues relating to the final development plan and some arbitrary TCP Rules such an “non inhabitable attics, no single window clearances and the power of the babus to extort money in passing of plans etc  which will be critically examined in the next article.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors. They do not purport to reflect the opinions or views of the Himachal Watcher.

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Dark Sides of Aadhar Amendment Act & Plea to Connect Aadhar With Voter ID

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Dark side of aadhar amendment act and linking it to voter id

Shimla-The September 2018 Aadhar case verdict of the five-judge constitution bench had said that there was nothing in the Aadhaar Act that violated the right to privacy of an individual. The bench headed by the then Chief Justice of India Dipak Misra had also upheld the passage of the Aadhaar Bill as a Money Bill by the Lok Sabha. Against the said judgment a Review was filed and is still pending in the Apex Court.

This month again, a Retired Army officer SG Vombatkere and human rights activist Bezwada Wilson, have filed the petition challenging the constitutional validity of the Aadhaar and Other Laws (Amendment) Ordinance, 2019 and the Aadhaar (Pricing of Aadhaar Authentication Services) Regulations, 2019. The Supreme Court heard the petitioners and issued a notice to the Central Government and Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI).

The petitioners have submitted that the Aadhaar Ordinance created a backdoor entry to private parties to access the Aadhaar eco-system, thus enabling state and private surveillance of citizens. The regulations also permitted the commercial exploitation of personal and sensitive information, collected and stored for state purposes only, they have claimed.

“The Adhaar Ordinance and Regulations are manifestly unconstitutional as they seek to re-legislate the provisions of the Aadhaar Act, 2016 which enabled commercial exploitation of personal information collected for the purposes of the state (by permitting private parties to access the Aadhaar database), which were specifically declared unconstitutional in Supreme Court’s decision dated September 26, 2018, in Justice Puttaswamy v. Union of India,

the petitioners have said.

The petition further submits that through the regulations, the UIDAI has expressly sought to commercialize and gain financially through the large-scale collection of citizens’ private data and the use of Aadhaar database by private entities.  People’s data, which was collected for the Aadhaar database, is their private property and permitting this to be commercialized is an impermissible violation of their dignity under Article 19 and 21 of the Constitution

The Aadhaar Ordinance, according to the petitioners, was promulgated in an improper exercise of the ordinance-making power of the President under Article 123. The President of India Ram Nath Kovind promulgated the Aadhaar Ordinance on March 3, 2019, after the Aadhaar bill lapsed due to the dissolution of 16thLok Sabha.

LINKING OF AADHAR WITH VOTER ID 

Two hundred public-spirited individuals have written a letter to the Election Commission of India (ECI) to warn against the dangers contained in a petition before the Delhi High Court seeking an e-voting system using fingerprint and face biometrics and for that purpose, linking Aadhaar numbers with voter IDs. The high court has issued directions in Ashwini Kumar Upadhyay vs Union of India, asking the Election Commission of India (ECI) to consider the plea within eight weeks.

Urging the ECI to seek a dismissal of the Upadhyay petition, the individuals said that Aadhaar linkage would harm the right to vote that Indian citizens have under our democracy, flowing from the Constitution and the Representation of People’s Act, 1951.

While the Representation of People’s Act, 1951 currently limited universal adult suffrage to Indian citizens (including non-resident Indians (NRIs) still holding an Indian passport), the letter pointed out that under Section 9 of the Aadhaar Act, 2016, the Aadhaar number or authentication did not constitute proof of citizenship. Therefore, “linking of Aadhaar number with voter ID would effectively be an exercise involving significant public expense and yielding no benefit whatsoever in determining the genuineness of voters”.

Warning that the linking would not just “weaken and contaminate” the Indian electoral system but also harm the functioning of our democracy, the individuals reminded the ECI of the many instances where Aadhaar IDs had been found with non-nationals or there had been blatantly incorrect and fake enrolments.

“We also ask the Hon’ble Commission to recollect the disastrous outcome of the previous exercise of Aadhaar-Voter ID linking conducted as part of the National Electoral Roll Purification and Authentication Program (NERPAP) in 2015, due to which at least 30 lakh voters disenfranchised. As that exercise demonstrates, carrying out timely door-to-door verification of voters is as yet the most effective method of updating electoral rolls and ensuring accuracy of voter data,”

they said.

“We would like to point out that not only does possess an Aadhaar number fail to qualify the number holder’s eligibility to vote, biometric-linked authentication would, on the contrary, disenfranchise many rightful voters, in particular, the elderly, manual labourers, and those living in areas suffering a lack of electric power and/or network coverage,”

the letter said.

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