Another blunder by Shimla MC to which Pollution Control Board has turned a blind eye

Burning garbage including dry leaves is illegal according to Supreme Court’s interpretation of Article 21 of Indian Constitution. Also, it’s strictly prohibited under “Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) rules 2000”.

SHIMLA- Did you ever wonder why the very institution of State Pollution Control Board even exists? How often you read about initiatives or actions taken by the board to control air, soil, water, visual and noise pollution? No activity from the boards is visible.

However, effects of air pollution are clearly visible. The weather pattern has changed a lot, now Shimla receives lesser snow that melts away by evening. The average temperature in winters has increased in Shimla. The minimum temperature in Shimla is between 8 and 15 degree C, which is quite unusual while there is no perceptible change in the temperature at Manali, Bhuntar, Una and Sundernagar.In terms of rainfall, Himachal is rain over 70 percent deficient this winter, and level of ground water has dipped. In summers, water shortage is likely to haunt Shimla. Another bad news is that most of the baoris (small natural water reserves) have either dried or have been declared unsafe for drinking purpose.


So, emissions and air pollution are critical and sensitive issues to which both public and government are insensitive.

Previous Story: ‘Unusual rise’ in Shimla’s minimum temp – A big reason to worry


Other than vehicular emission, it’s a very common and regular scene around Shimla city to see heaps of fallen leaves burning on roadsides, even in drains. In Delhi, 30% of air pollution is caused by biomass (garbage, wood, and fallen leaves) and air quality of Delhi has reached alarming levels. Therefore, Delhi government has strictly warned people about facing maximum penalty (Rs. 20,000 – 1 lakh depending upon circumstances) stipulated by the National Green Tribunal to curb the rampant practice of garbage and green waste burning in the cities.


Previous Story: Why Himachal must act now to cut down diesel emissions

A bench headed by NGT chairperson Justice Swatanter Kumar had also taken notice of rampart burning of biomass and garbage had directed state governments of Delhi, Haryana, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh to immediately spread mass awareness regarding ill-effects of burning waste materials in open areas. NGT had clearly stated that,

It is on record before us that burning of garbage and other materials is not only source of air pollution but forms 29.4 per cent of air pollution with reference to PM10. Burning of material also causes serious respiratory problems and is even carcinogenic. There shall be complete prohibition on burning of any kind of garbage, leaves, waste, plastic, rubber or any such other materials in open areas.”

The bench had also added,

We direct that for every incident of burning of such material, the person who is found burning or responsible for burning would be liable to pay compensation in terms of Section 15 of the National Green Tribunal Act, 2010 under the principle of polluter pays.

So, what Shimla MC and Pollution Control Board are waiting for – to get things worse, as it happened in Rohtang-Pass or in case of jaundice outbreak in Shimla due Ashwani Khud water contamination that has killed about 8 people so far and has landed thousands in hospitals?


Burning garbage including dry leaves is illegal according to Supreme Court’s interpretation of Article 21 of Indian Constitution. Also, it’s strictly prohibited under “Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) rules 2000”. Along with air pollution, it also poses many health hazards.


The health hazards caused by burning any kind of biomass including fallen, dry leaves and grass includes respiratory, neurological, cardiac diseases and even cancers due to long exposure to the smoke. Amount of carbon and toxic gases released is higher in biomass burning due to higher amount of moisture.

Click To View : Pollutants Released from Burning Biomass and Garbage and Related Health Effects

Health Hazards of waste burning

Fallen leaves make excellent compost if transported to waste management plants or to other specified facilities. Himachal is an agricultural state and compost could be supplied to growers. However, our talented IAS, HPS officers and politicians have chosen burning the leaves and garbage. Clearly, our government lacks vision and the public lacks awareness. Our government is always short of funds for such causes except for their luxury fleet of cars with beacons, fat salaries, and allowances.

Himachal Watcher is forwarding the complaint to Shimla MC and State Pollution Control Board and also expect people to understand why garbage and biomass must be properly disposed and not burn it. Places like Shimla need awareness drives organized by government and environmental groups.

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