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Baddi Family Buried in Garbage by BBNDA Gets Relief from High Court, Authorities Directed to Relocate It

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Petition in Baddi Lanfill Case

Solan- The State Government of Himachal Pradesh is a disaster if its management and disposal of solid waste are considered. The State Pollution Control Board, local civil bodies, health department and every authority responsible for environmental protection and sanitation are in deep slumber, from which even the Hon’ble High Court is not able to wake them up. Not only these state agencies show disregard to environmental laws, court orders, but also show extreme insensitivity towards the lives of the people who are affected by unscientific dumping of solid waste and pollution of rivers.

The biggest example came to light when Kenduwal village in Baddi of Solan district approached the court with their plea to save them from the Baddi Municipal Council and Baddi-Barotiwala-Nalagarh Development Authority. They literally buried a family in the garbage by creating an illegal dumping site near their habitat. The BBNDA was supposed to construct a waste treatment plant in 2012, but instead they just created a dumping site that became a breeding ground for flies, mosquitoes, rats, etc. and it caused an alarming increase in the incident of illnesses even to people who live in the neighbouring villages like Sheetalpur, Malpur, Bhudd, and MalkhuMajra. Nearly 1200 residents had filed a complaint to the SDM, Baddi and submitted that the Baddi Municipal Council had been dumping waste near their village without developing the site.

The worst affected family, living just 30 meters from the landfill, had approached various authorities with their grievance but was not attended at all. One reason could be attributed to the fact that this family belonged to the minority community (Gujjars). After the advocate for the petitioner’s family, Deven Khanna, fought a long legal battle against the state, the family has now received some hope by getting interim relief.

On May 21, 2019, the High Court of Himachal Pradesh, while hearing the petition of the family, directed the Baddi-Barotiwala-Nalagarh Development Authority (BBNDA) to consider relocating it.

In their application submitted to the court, the family had sought adequate compensation and rehabilitation/relocation. The petitioner had told the court that even after various orders from this Hon’ble Court, the responsible authorities were continuously disregarding the Solid Waste Management Rules and also the Orders of this Hon’ble Court.  As a result of it, the house of the affected family was turned into a garbage dump.

The petition also said that the authorities never took any consent from the adjoining houses before creating the dumping site, nor proposed relocation to the inhabitants. The petitioner with his family and cattle has been forced to live in life-threatening circumstances, the application said.

It’s pertinent to mention that despite the court orders to stop dumping waste on the said site, the authority allegedly took to threatening the petitioner’s family instead of acting on the orders.

“Petitioner is being threatened in various ways, while the mandatory compliances under the statute are continuously being flouted by the Respondents,”

the family had prayed in the application to the court.

Eventually, in its order passed on May 21, 2019, the court directed the authorities to consider relocation of the petitioner’s family.

In previous hearings, the court found out that the MC and BBNDA had obtained clearance for construction an Integrated Solid Waste Management Plant at this site in 2015, but never actually constructed it. Instead, it kept dumping entire waste in open.

The dumping ground violated several rules related to the creation of landfills. According to the Schedule (I) (a), Clause (VII) (VIII) of the Solid Waste Management Rules, 2016:

  1. The Landfill site shall be 100 mt away from river, 200 mt from a pond, 200 mt from highway, habitations, public parks and water-supply wells and 20 km away from airports or Airbase.
  2. The Landfill site shall not be permitted within these flood plains as recorded for the last 100 years, Zone of coastal regulation, wetland, critical habitat areas, sensitive eco-fragile areas.
  3. This landfill was created in violation of all these rules as it is located on a floodplain of Sirsa river and just 30 meters away from human habitat.

Further, this dumping site also violated the directions passed by the National Green Tribunal in its recent judgment (O.A No. 673/2018).

The directions of the Tribunal clearly mentions maintaining the environmental flow of the river, checking constructions on floodplains, setting up of regulating or stopping the industrial activity of polluting nature, checking mining activities and disposal of bio-medical and other wastes, etc.

After the court’s interventions, on February 25, 2019, the Chief Executive Officer, BBNDA, Baddi, District Solan, H.P. had filed an affidavit-cum-status report. In this affidavit, the Chief Executive Officer had said that they would be able to establish the complete processing facility at the designated site Kenduwal within 12 months i.e. before 8th February 2020.  The affidavit further said that the work of 100% collection and transportation of Municipal Solid Waste from within the entire project area comprising 41 Gram Panchayats as well as Municipal Council, Baddi, Municipal Council, Nalagarh and Municipal Council, Parwanoo will be started by May 8, 2019.

In this order, the court had said,

“Though, as per the affidavit, BBNDA has placed 109 dumpers, 12 garbage collection tanks, 3 dumper placers, 5 tractor trolleys, and 60 labourers, yet the fact of the matter is that the entire untreated Municipal Solid Waste is not being picked up and substantial part thereof is being dumped in open.”

“We, therefore, direct the BBNDA to submit a time-bound plan for lifting the entire Municipal Solid Waste lying in open area and for that purpose if need be, let the proposal be sent to the State Government for its intervention to provide additional machinery and manpower under the Corporate Social Responsibility,”

the court order further stated.

Later, in another status report-cum-affidavit filed in the court on April 8, 2019, the Chief Executive Officer had told the court that the following steps would be taken in compliance with the orders passed by the court:

  1. Additional 33 dumpers (garbage containers) in the 33 left out Gram Panchayat will be placed by the concessionaire by 15/04/2019.
  2. The detailed project report will be submitted by the concessionaire upto 20/04/2019.
  3. The operational plan for collection and transportation of Municipal Solid Waste will be submitted by the concessionaire up to 25/04/2019.
  4. The electronic weighbridge will be installed by the concessionaire at the designated site Kenduwal upto 30/04/2019.
  5. The CCTV cameras will be installed by the concessionaire at the designated site Kenduwal upto 30/04/2019.
  6. The work of 100% collection and transportation of Municipal Solid Waste from within the entire project area by deploying about 180 number of employees will be started by the concessionaire by 08/05/2019.

Currently, some of the solid waste was still being dumped on the same site while remaining was being sent to a treatment plant in Chandigarh. The work of construction of a waste treatment plant is also underway.

Further, in his elaborated petition filed in 2018, the advocate for the petitioners had urged the court to consider the lack of solid waste management and treatment facility in the entire state, which leads to environmental degradation on a large scale. In their petition, petitioners through Advocate Deven Khanna had requested the court to pass following directions:

General direction to the local bodies to strictly impose a heavy fine on the violators of the law.

  1. Ordering absolute Strictness with regards to throwing garbage in water bodies (rivers, nallahs). He suggested that the fine collected should be used for the restoration of the damaged places.
  2. Officers in charge should be made personally liable if flagrant violations are found in their jurisdictions
  3. Secretary, Town Planning should be directed to ensure that the Master Plan of every city in the State has the provision for setting up of solid waste processing and disposal facilities
  4. Secretary, Urban Development of the State of Himachal and Secretary Panchayats/Rural Development should be directed to prepare the State policy and strategy on solid waste management for the entire State in consultation with the stakeholders.
  5. District Magistrates in the State in coordination with the Secretary, Urban Development, should be directed to ensure identification and allocation of suitable land
  6. Pollution Control Board should be directed to ensure due compliance of the Solid Waste Management Rules, 2016 as per Rule 16 of the Rules.
  7. Direction should be passed to the local authorities i.e. Municipalities, Municipal Corporations, and Panchayat Raj Institutions not to dump the garbage in the river streams/rivulets and forest areas forthwith.
  8. All the Municipalities, Municipal Corporations, Panchayats and other statutory authorities, throughout the State, should be directed to regularly publish the names of concerned Superintendents of Sanitation, Medical Officers and Sanitary Officers and such equivalent officers who are responsible for cleaning the State who can be approached for any complaint/grievance by the citizens of the State.

Madan has studied English Literature and Journalism from HP University and lives in Shimla. He is an amateur photographer and has been writing on topics ranging from environmental, socio-economic, development programs, education, eco-tourism, eco-friendly lifestyle and to green technologies for over 9 years now. He has an inclination for all things green, wonderful and loves to live in solitude. When not writing, he can be seen wandering, trying to capture the world around him in his DSLR lens.

Environment

Himachal to Adopt ‘Borehole Resin Extraction’ Method to Minimize Damage to Pine Trees & Maximize Quality

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Pine Resin Trapping in Himachal Pradesh

Solan-In the past decade, intensive resin tapping by rill method has resulted in the drying of thousands of pine trees in Himachal Pradesh. It has also been observed, that the application of higher concentration of acid, used as a freshener, had adversely affected the growth of trees and even the tapped surface area is not healing.

Therefore, the HP State Forest Development Corporation will soon adopt the borehole technique of oleoresin extraction to minimize the damage caused to pine trees by resin tapping and simultaneously increase the quality of the collected resin.

It was informed by Himachal Pradesh Forest Minister Sh. Gobind Singh Thakur during the concluding session of the one-day training of officials from HP State Forest Development Corporation at the Dr YS Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry (UHF) Nauni. The method has been developed by the scientists of the Forest Products Department of the university. 

Bore hole resin extraction

Borehole Resin Extraction’ Method

The Forest Minister said that the department would adopt the new technique in the coming time so that the twin motives of resin quality and its quantity along with ensuring the good health of the trees can be met. He said that the Forest Department will work in collaboration with the university so that the benefit of the various technologies developed by it can be put to the best use for the development of the state.

BD Suyal, MD State Forest Corporation said that technique is quite encouraging and the corporation will take up setting up 10-15,000 bores in every directorate to assess the results of the method. He added that in the second phase the contractors and the labourers will be also be trained on technique by the university. Earlier, Dr Kulwant Rai Sharma gave a detailed presentation and practical demonstration on the technique to the forest officials. He said that the adoption of the technology can prove to be boon for the forests and the resin industry. 

What is Borehole Method of Resin Extraction  

The new method involves drilling small holes (1 inch wide and 4 inches deep) with the help of simple tools into the tree to open its resin ducts. The holes are drilled with a slight slope towards the opening, so that oleoresin drains freely. Multiple boreholes are arrayed evenly around the tree’s circumference, or clustered in groups of two or three. Spouts are tightly fitted into the opening with polythene bags attached to it with the help of tie for resin collection.

resin trappig method in Himachal Pradesh

Borehole Resin Extraction’ Method

The new technique was developed in an attempt to overcome some of the limitations of other conventional methods. A key feature of the method is that a closed collection apparatus prevents premature solidification of resin acids, thereby maintaining oleoresin flow for an extended period of up to six months. Due to reduced oxidation and contamination, the end product is of higher quality with substantially higher turpentine. The average yield per tree is almost the same if numbers of boreholes on a tree are adjusted as per the maximum carrying capacity of the tree. The method also allows tapping of lower diameter trees depending upon their potential of production without having any impact on their health. The crown fire hazards incidents are also less because there is no hard resin accumulation on the main stem and spread of ground blaze can be easily avoided by removing the bags well in time.

The rosin and turpentine oil obtained from borehole method are of very good quality, which can fetch higher prices in the market. In addition to tackling the problems of tree health, labour requirements and costs for borehole tapping are significantly lower than conventional methods. The borehole wounds cause little damage to the tree bark and since these holes are near the ground level, only a healed scar can be seen in the converted woods. Therefore, there is no damage to the merchantable part of the tree.

Further, the Forest Minister also said that the university and the forest department will look to work together for establishing an eco-tourism model on the university campus. He added that the University Vice-Chancellor will be invited to all the important policy meetings of the state forest department to seek their expertise. The forest minister visited the demonstration block of borehole technique and also planted a tree at the university.

UHF Vice-Chancellor Dr Parvinder Kaushal called for continuous interaction between the university and the forest department. He emphasized on apprising the grass root level workers and train them on the new technique.

The event was attended by  BD Suyal, Managing Director, HP Forest Corporation; KK Kataik Director(South); Dr JN Sharma, Director Research, Dr Kulwant Rai Dean College of Forestry and other officials of the university. Around 30 officers of the rank of Divisional Managers and Assistant Managers from various parts of the state took part in the training.

 

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Shrikhand Mahadev Faces Garbage Crisis, IMF Team Collects 1900 kg Garbage During 12-Day Cleaning Campaign

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IMF shrikhand Mahadev Cleaning Campaign 2019 f

Kullu-During 2019 season, a local boy treks the holy shrine of Shrikhand Mahadev. Shrikhand is not only a holy place but is also a very beautiful and picturesque place at an altitude of 5300 metres.

Lalit Mohan had imagined the place to be green, clean and tranquil, which was the reason he had decided to trek it. Little did he know that the mountain was no longer the grand trail he had trekked years ago. He was shocked over what has become of this place. There was crowd everywhere and terraces had been cut over the campsites to accommodate numerous tents. Most of the water sources had dried up and remaining were badly polluted with plastic waste. He was surprised that the situation was the same even at the top, which is supposed to be the holy spot. A lot of offerings were made in plastic bags and glass bottles.

IMF shrikhand Mahadev Cleaning Campaign 2019 2

He returned to Delhi and wrote a letter to the Director of Indian Mountaineering Federation (IMF) for hosting a cleaning drive along the entire trek. With a positive response from the director IMF, Col. H.S. Chauhan, a cleaning drive expedition was planned by the IMF in collaboration with the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports and NSS. A team was formed that comprised of the members of the Indian Mountain Federation Lalit Kanwar, Praveen Dahiya, Hemant Sharma, Nikhil Chauhan and Rajat Jamwal. The team was led by Lalit Mohan. The expedition was flagged off by the SDM, Anni, Kullu district, on October 2, 2019.

The team got to work from the base campsite at Shingad and collected unethically disposed of garbage from the campsites at Brati Nala, Reyosh Thach, Khumba, Thathi Bheel, Thachru, Kali Ghati, Bhim Talai, Kungsha, Bhim Dwar, Parvati Bagh, Nain Sarovar and the Shrine on top. The garbage mostly comprised of remains of plastic sheets, bottles, wrappers, left-over food etc.

IMF shrikhand Mahadev Cleaning Campaign 2019 2

Two major reasons behind this widespread littering and unethical disposal of garbage are the public feasts (Bhandaras) and the pandals erected to host them. Moreover, there were around 700 private tents which were set up throughout the mountain. Also, these tents do not provide even temporary toilets and visitors relieve themselves in open wherever they can. 

It is also important to note that the Kurpan stream, which flows through this valley, is the only snow-fed source of drinking water for many villages.

IMF shrikhand Mahadev Cleaning Campaign 2019 3

It appears that authorities responsible for granting permission for setting up campsites in this fragile environment did not pay any attention to prepare a proper plan for waste management. Most of the area falls in the reserve forest category, and it is surprising to see that according to the forest rules, no one can be granted permission to set up a campsite in a reserve forest area.

Strong religious sentiments are associated with the Shrine of Shrikhand Mahadev, but growing movement of visitors without proper management in such a fragile environment has its own side-effects.
IMF shrikhand Mahadev Cleaning Campaign 2019 4

The team made their way to the top in minus 10 degrees temperature and was shocked to find plastic waste strewn over the glacier too. The team collected a total of 1900 kgs of garbage in about 170 sacks. The sacks were ferried down the mountain with the help of local people, who came ahead to support the team in its quest during the expedition. The team returned to Nirmand village on the October 14. The garbage was deposited with the Block Development officer at Nirmand. The team held meetings with schools students at Jaon and Bagipul villages to spread the message of conserving and protecting the environment and taking steps to maintain cleanliness in the mountains.

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Environment

HIMCOSTE ENVIS HUB Training on “Securing High Range Himalayan Ecosystems” Begins Today

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HIMCOSTE ENVIS HUB Training

Shimla- HP ENVIS HUB at Himachal Pradesh Council for Science, Technology and Environment (HIMCOSTE), Shimla, today kicked off its one-month training program on Para-taxonomy under the GoI-UNDP-GEF Project “Securing Livelihoods, Conservation, Sustainable use and Restoration of high range Himalayan Ecosystems” (SECURE Himalaya).

This program is being conducted in collaboration with HP Forest Department and State Biodiversity Board for Lahaul, Pangi and Kinnaur landscapes of the State. Under this program, selected youth would be trained for documentation of local biodiversity in the form of People’s Biodiversity Registers (PBRs).

The Chief Guest of the inaugural function was Dr Savita, Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife). Sh. Anil Thakur, CCF (Wildlife) and Dr S.P. Bhardwaj, Retd Associate Director, Regional Fruit Research Station, UHF, Nauni were special guests on the occasion.

Speaking on the inaugural function today, Dr Savita, PCCF (Wildlife) said that snow leopard is the iconic animal of high Himalayas. A good number of these apex predators denote a healthy ecosystem. To ensure the survival of these beautiful animals, sustainable use of forest resources and generation of alternative livelihood opportunities is pertinent.

The initial step to conserving local biodiversity is its documentation as Peoples Biodiversity Registers (PBRs). She lauded the efforts of ENVIS Hub in implementation of Green Skill Development Program (GSDP) last year and now training students in SECURE Project.

Dr Aparna Sharma, Coordinator, HP ENVIS Hub, informed that under this course, selected students would be imparted theoretical and practical knowledge by eminent experts in the fields of botany, zoology, forestry, wildlife, importance and conservation of Biodiversity, waste management, remote sensing & GIS. In association with State Biodiversity Board, field visits would be carried out to prominent Universities, Research Institutions and conservation areas of Himachal Pradesh for exposure to local flora, fauna and its documentation in PBRs.

A total of nine students have been selected for the training program: six from Pangi, two from Lahaul and one from Shimla. The best of trained youth would be involved in making PBRs in selected landscapes by the HP State Biodiversity Board.

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